Right to be heard objected to on ground of want of precision or informality

44.8An objection which has sometimes been taken to the right to be heard of a petitioner is that the allegations of their petition are not sufficiently specific;1 but the Court of Referees has rarely refused a hearing for this reason alone,2 and, as already pointed out (see para 44.3 ), Standing Order 128 expressly enables the committee on a bill to require a petitioner to give in a more specific statement of the grounds of their opposition.

An analogous objection that has frequently been taken to the right to be heard of petitioners is that their petition is informal, according to the rules and orders of the House applicable to petitions generally (see Chapter 24), or as specially applicable to petitions against private bills.

Footnotes

  1. 1. Suppl to Votes, 1847–48, p 322; 1849, p 173; 1851, pp 103, 108, 109, 110; Minutes of Committees, 1857, ii, p 707; 1 C & R 22, 201; 3 ibid 50, 81, 442; R & M 213.
  2. 2. 1 S & A 341; and cf 1 C & R 207; 3 ibid 301, 457 (landowners' petition); 2 S & A 106 (petition of local authority under SO 134A (now 97)); 1 S & B 43, 100, 134, 143.