Obstruction or molestation

15.18It is a contempt to obstruct or molest those employed by or entrusted with the execution of the orders of either House while in the execution of their duty. Contempts of this character have included assaults,1 insulting and abusive behaviour2 or threatening language,3 resistance to those acting in execution of the orders of either House,4 aiding the escape of an individual from the order for their custody or committal,5 refusal of civil officers to assist in executing the orders of either House6 and the discharge out of custody by a magistrate of a prisoner arrested by order of either House.7

Both Houses will treat as contempts not only acts directly tending to obstruct their officers in the execution of their duty but also any conduct which may tend to deter them from doing their duty in the future.

Footnotes

  1. 1. For assaults on officers, see LJ (1718–21) 190; CJ (1667–87) 193; ibid (1718–21) 366, 370; and LJ (1805–06) 125. For assaults on others entrusted with the execution of the House's orders, see LJ (1787–90) 649; ibid (1790–93) 665; ibid (1794–96) 241; CJ (1732–37) 308; ibid (1750–54) 900, 904; ibid (1761–64) 126, 128: and see ibid (1667–87) 678 for the punishment of a person who assaulted another for seeking the assistance of a constable in securing a delinquent whom the Commons had ordered into custody.
  2. 2. In the case of officers, see LJ (1805–06) 332, 340, 608, 610; ibid (1810–12) 370, 399; CJ (1722–27) 185; and of other persons, LJ (1783–87) 613, 647; ibid (1787–90) 338.
  3. 3. CJ (1693–97) 512, 514.
  4. 4. Resisting or hindering officers in the execution of their duty, see CJ (1660–67) 222; ibid (1667–87) 341; ibid (1930–31) 335, 338: resisting or hindering others, see CJ (1699–1702) 825; ibid (1732–37) 308, 508, 511; ibid (1761–64) 128, 130.
  5. 5. LJ (1718–21) 190; CJ (1667–87) 193.
  6. 6. LJ (1660–66) 134; CJ (1667–87) 193, 587.
  7. 7. CJ (1770–72) 263, 285, 289.