Complicated questions

20.27When two or more propositions are contained in one motion before the House, they may be taken separately if any Member objects to their being taken together.1 The principle can be applied to motions which under a standing order must be decided without amendment or debate, eg business motions under Standing Order No 15 (see para 19.39, fn 1) and to motions moved after the moment of interruption. A complicated question can be divided only if each part is capable of standing on its own.2

Footnotes

  1. 1. Parl Deb (1888) 324, c 1828. Although this ruling does not appear to have been based on any previous decision, it has since remained unchallenged, HC Deb (1968–69) 772, c 4 (motion); ibid (1968–69) 785, c 1014 and ibid (1971–72) 834, c 1313 (amendments to bills). See also the Speaker's remarks, Parl Deb (1905) 149, c 897; HC Deb (1912) 43, c 1994.
  2. 2. HC Deb (1962–63) 667, cc 390, 523; ibid (1979–80) 979, cc 1743–48, 1787–88; ibid (1985–86) 98, c 1198.