Ceremonial speeches and tributes

19.23Ceremonial speeches have been allowed at this juncture. While they were originally confined to commemorations on the deaths of distinguished Members or former Members of the House, in recent times the practice has been extended to others.1 The Speaker has paid tribute at this time to a former Speaker who died on the previous day.2 However, in the case of tributes to a Member, the Speaker has called on Members to pay tributes immediately after questions and before ministerial statements.3 Motions on matters of this kind, and amendments to them, have been allowed to be moved without notice.4 Such speeches are usually made by the Leader of the House and supported by brief speeches from leaders of parties not in office. The House was recalled in 2013 in order to pay tributes to a former Prime Minister, no other business being taken on that day.5

Footnotes

  1. 1. HC Deb (1941–42) 376, cc 320–24; ibid (1942–43) 386, cc 48–49, 1059–63; ibid (1942–43) 390, cc 1946–50; ibid (1962–63) 666, cc 801–4; ibid (1964–65) 718, cc 165–71; ibid (1971–72) 838, cc 37–49; ibid (1972–73) 846, cc 914–21; ibid (1986–87) 108, cc 21–31.
  2. 2. HC Deb (1977–78) 950, cc 774–75.
  3. 3. HC Deb (1981–82) 13, cc 2, 19–21; and ibid (1994–95) 264, cc 19–29; and ibid (2004–05) 432, cc 1123–37 for cases of former Prime Ministers who had died during an adjournment; and see also ibid (1994–95) 265, cc 597–603, when tributes were paid to the assassinated Prime Minister of Israel.
  4. 4. HC Deb (1971–72) 838, cc 37, 49.
  5. 5. HC Deb (10 April 2013) 560, c 1619 ff; see also ibid (9 December 2013) 572, cc 1–10, for a day of tributes, with no question before the House.