Adjournment in cases of grave disorder

17.18Under Standing Order No 46, in the event of grave disorder arising in the House, the Speaker may adjourn the House without question put if they think it necessary to do so1 or may suspend the sitting to a time to be named by them.2

Footnotes

  1. 1. CJ (1905) 202; ibid (1911) 351; ibid (1914) 237; ibid (1924) 178; ibid (1960–61) 98; ibid (1975–76) 360 (after he had previously suspended the sitting to a named hour, and after grave disorder had again arisen at the resumption); ibid (1989–90) 247.
  2. 2. CJ (1920) 436; ibid (1974–75) 259; ibid (1977–78) 438, when the Speaker made a statement on the suspension, HC Deb (1977–78) 953, c 677; CJ (1979–80) 851; ibid (1981–82) 27. On 13 November 1912 and 11 April 1923, the Speaker suspended the sitting for an hour. When he resumed the Chair, the state of disorder continued and he adjourned the House without question put (CJ (1912–13) 409; ibid (1923) 88). On 6 December 1961, grave disorder having arisen in a Committee of the whole House, the Chairman left the Chair to report the circumstances to the House; he resumed the Chair as Deputy Speaker and suspended the sitting for half an hour (CJ (1961–62) 55). See also paras 21.46, 28.86.